How Does The Manufacture Process Differ Using CAD

Using CAD, designs can be drawn out very accurately on screen and rendered photographically so that my customer knows exactly what their piece of jewellery is going to look like.

For the past 40 years I have created jewellery principally by carving wax models by hand using files , various rotary burrs, engraving tools, drills etc.

Once a wax model has been approved by the customer it is then sent to my caster in Birmingham and my model will be one of maybe 50 individual models built on to a wax “Tree”.

Once the “Tree” structure has been completed it is then covered by a stainless steel tube and plaster of Paris is poured in and solidifies to make a mold. This mould is then put into a kiln and the wax melts and is burnt out of the mould leaving a space where the wax tree had been.

Using centrifugal vacuum casting,
molten precious metal is shot into the mould
and flows along the tree like space

 

Once the metal has solidified and cooled down the plaster of Paris is shot blasted away to leave a metal tree.  My metal model is then cut from the “Tree” and sent back to me for cleaning, polishing and setting.

Using CAD, designs can be drawn out very accurately on screen and rendered photographically so that my customer knows exactly what their piece of jewellery is going to look like.

Once the design has been approved I then create an STL file (stereolithography file) which allows the design to be read by a 3D printer and I send that file to my caster who 3D prints the file and then builds that file on to a wax “Tree”.

This means that the model produced is much more accurate than something carved hand to eye.